Phone - 440-548-5408

Not yet Registered in our auction system? Click "Register" near top of auction homepage.

Registered  but forgot password?  Click "Sign In" and then "Forgot Password."

Bid increments change at the following levels:

$2 from $0 up to $20.... $2, $4, $6, $8, etc.                $5 from $20 up to $50.....  $20, $25, $30, $35, $40,  etc.               $10 from $50 up to $250....... $50, $60, $70, $80, etc.

$25 from $250 up to $750..... $250, $275, $300, $325, etc.                    $50 from $750 up to $1,500.... $750, $800, $850, $900 etc.

$100 from $1500 up to $3,000... $1500, $1600, $1700, $1800 etc.        $250 from $3000 up to $6,000.... $3000, $3250, $3500,  etc.

$500 from $6000 up to $12,000....  $6000, $6500, $7000,  etc.              $1000 from $12,000 up to $30,000            $2500 from $30,000 & up

 

Pole Top Discoveries' Event #2404 

Invoices should be completed by mid afternoon Saturday

 

× Bidding has ended on this item.
12.00%  Buyer's Premium
This Auction Uses Proxy Bidding.
Ended

#2104     1000      Glass block.       Aqua.

  Lot # 2104
Listing Image
Pole_Top_Discoveries
Details
  • Lot # 2104
  • System ID # 521948
  • End Date
  • Start Date
Description

#2104     1000      Glass block.       Aqua.

A 2018 creek bed discovery in the vicinity of Loess Bluff, Mississippi, this glass block was used on a telegraph line which linked the North with New Orleans, Louisiana in the late 1840's.  The line traversed from Pittsburgh, across southern Ohio, to Louisville, Kentucky, Nashville, Tennessee, Tuscumbia, Alabama, then to the Mississippi cities of Jackson and Natchez and eventually to New Orleans. Louisiana.  See fourth image showing a map of the lower section of the route.  The telegraph route is shown between the cities with dotted lines. 

As mentioned previously the insulator was found near Loess Bluff, which is several miles northeast of Natchez, on the Mississippi River.  The telegraph line ran through the immediate area where the insulator was found, so it likely travelled little distance into the creek bed.

Sand and sediment traveling over the insulator for a long period of time has left the insulator surface with a "sea glass' appearance.  Flakes and chips on the insulator edges now have a sandblasted, frosty appearance (see photos). 

A unique example!