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Pole Top Discoveries' "Late August" Auction (Closed #281416)

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#612 - 735 - CHESTER - Aqua.

  Lot # 612
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Pole_Top_Discoveries
Details
  • Lot # 612
  • System ID # 283790
  • End Date
  • Start Date
Description

#612     735      CHESTER.      Aqua.       

A small number of 735 Chesters have been found along the Union Pacific Railroad right of way in Nebraska and Wyoming.  Aside from those few examples, the majority have been discovered in British Columbia, Canada, where they were used mostly on the 1866 segment of the Collins Overland Telegraph Company line.  Sections of the “Collins line” were built in 1865 and 1866 as part of a grand project devised to link America with Europe via land lines.

This is one of the few examples found along the route of the historic U.P.R.R., America's first trans-continental railroad, completed in 1869.

Areas of the glass surface are cloudy from exposure to the highly alkaline soil.  Shallow base flakes.  A portion of the top is missing, likely from a "frost pop" after water settled in the pinhole.  Displays excellent from the front, and the frost pop is shallow, so it's hardly noticeable even when view from the reverse.

From the collection of the late Lawrence Carpenter.