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"Mid September" Auction (Closed #292916)

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Ended

#672 - 735.3   -  U.S. TEL. CO.   -   CHESTER N.Y.   -    Dark aqua.

  Lot # 672
Listing Image
Pole_Top_Discoveries
Details
  • Lot # 672
  • System ID # 294950
  • End Date
  • Start Date
Description

#672      735.3     U.S. TEL. CO.      CHESTER N.Y.      Dark aqua.    

Made by a glass works in the 1860’s for the telegraph supply company operated by Charles and John Chester of New York. The Chesters had the insulators marked with the name of their business, as well as the telegraph company they were supplying.  They were produced in light aqua as well as this attractive darker shade of aqua.  

Examples of the 735.1 have been found in northern California and Nevada. The United States Telegraph Company used these insulators on a portion of a transcontinental line they constructed eastward from San Francisco, into the Nevada desert, and then linking with Salt Lake City.

Still retains some rust on the glass surface of the wire groove from the iron wire!

Entire insulator remains in excellent condition, except for one index finger nail chip on the wire ridge, above the "O" as seen in the first photo.